Shorter Excerpts (From A Work In Progress)

guardian:

Schoolchildren are amazed to see Batman from a skyscraper skydeck in Melbourne, Australia. Stuntman Chris Davies scaled the outside of the Eureka Tower along with Catwoman. Photo: Graham Denholm/Getty Images. 
More photo highlights of the day »


They shouldn’t be. Melbourne is literally Batman’s city.

guardian:

Schoolchildren are amazed to see Batman from a skyscraper skydeck in Melbourne, Australia. Stuntman Chris Davies scaled the outside of the Eureka Tower along with Catwoman. Photo: Graham Denholm/Getty Images. 

More photo highlights of the day »

They shouldn’t be. Melbourne is literally Batman’s city.

(Source: theguardian.com, via nprfreshair)

Unpopular Thought #49834485

abloodymess:

istealforksfromrestaurants:

I am unsettled by people I met in my 20s who have not seemed to have changed much at all. 

Even scarier are the people who haven’t changed from high school

“…my husband and I do kind of the same job. A little bit. Not long ago we both had one of those magical days, we call it a junket, where we both attended these lovely events where people come in every four minutes, they ask the same questions over and over again — you know the drill. We got home at night and compared notes," she continued. "I told him, ‘Every single person who interviewed me, and I mean every single one — and this is true of the red carpet here tonight Elle — asked me, ‘How do you balance work and family?’ And, he said the only thing anyone asked him repeatedly was about the tits on the "Blurred Lines" girl — which, just for the record, if we’re talking about them, they are real and they are fabulous, so everyone should take a look and enjoy — but as for a work-life balance, he said that no one asked him about it that day, as a matter of fact, no one had ever asked him about it. Not once. And we do share the same family. Isn’t it kind of time to change that conversation?”
Jennifer Garner at Elle’s Women in Hollywood Celebration (via somuchsass)

(via peterwknox)

“In a relationship, you need somebody who’s going to call you out, not somebody who’s going to let everything slide. You need somebody who doesn’t want to live without you, but can. Not somebody that is dependent, but somebody who is stronger with you. A relationship is two people, not one.”
— Unknown  (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: everylittlestar, via ca-thar-si-s)

neurosciencestuff:

Mental Rest and Reflection Boost Learning
A new study, which may have implications for approaches to education, finds that brain mechanisms engaged when people allow their minds to rest and reflect on things they’ve learned before may boost later learning.
Scientists have already established that resting the mind, as in daydreaming, helps strengthen memories of events and retention of information. In a new twist, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have shown that the right kind of mental rest, which strengthens and consolidates memories from recent learning tasks, helps boost future learning.
The results appear online this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Margaret Schlichting, a graduate student researcher, and Alison Preston, an associate professor of psychology and neuroscience, gave participants in the study two learning tasks in which participants were asked to memorize different series of associated photo pairs. Between the tasks, participants rested and could think about anything they chose, but brain scans found that the ones who used that time to reflect on what they had learned earlier in the day fared better on tests pertaining to what they learned later, especially where small threads of information between the two tasks overlapped. Participants seemed to be making connections that helped them absorb information later on, even if it was only loosely related to something they learned before.
"We’ve shown for the first time that how the brain processes information during rest can improve future learning," says Preston. "We think replaying memories during rest makes those earlier memories stronger, not just impacting the original content, but impacting the memories to come.
Until now, many scientists assumed that prior memories are more likely to interfere with new learning. This new study shows that at least in some situations, the opposite is true.
"Nothing happens in isolation," says Preston. "When you are learning something new, you bring to mind all of the things you know that are related to that new information. In doing so, you embed the new information into your existing knowledge."
Preston described how this new understanding might help teachers design more effective ways of teaching. Imagine a college professor is teaching students about how neurons communicate in the human brain, a process that shares some common features with an electric power grid. The professor might first cue the students to remember things they learned in a high school physics class about how electricity is conducted by wires.
"A professor might first get them thinking about the properties of electricity," says Preston. "Not necessarily in lecture form, but by asking questions to get students to recall what they already know. Then, the professor might begin the lecture on neuronal communication. By prompting them beforehand, the professor might help them reactivate relevant knowledge and make the new material more digestible for them."
This research was conducted with adult participants. The researchers will next study whether a similar dynamic is at work with children.

neurosciencestuff:

Mental Rest and Reflection Boost Learning

A new study, which may have implications for approaches to education, finds that brain mechanisms engaged when people allow their minds to rest and reflect on things they’ve learned before may boost later learning.

Scientists have already established that resting the mind, as in daydreaming, helps strengthen memories of events and retention of information. In a new twist, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have shown that the right kind of mental rest, which strengthens and consolidates memories from recent learning tasks, helps boost future learning.

The results appear online this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Margaret Schlichting, a graduate student researcher, and Alison Preston, an associate professor of psychology and neuroscience, gave participants in the study two learning tasks in which participants were asked to memorize different series of associated photo pairs. Between the tasks, participants rested and could think about anything they chose, but brain scans found that the ones who used that time to reflect on what they had learned earlier in the day fared better on tests pertaining to what they learned later, especially where small threads of information between the two tasks overlapped. Participants seemed to be making connections that helped them absorb information later on, even if it was only loosely related to something they learned before.

"We’ve shown for the first time that how the brain processes information during rest can improve future learning," says Preston. "We think replaying memories during rest makes those earlier memories stronger, not just impacting the original content, but impacting the memories to come.

Until now, many scientists assumed that prior memories are more likely to interfere with new learning. This new study shows that at least in some situations, the opposite is true.

"Nothing happens in isolation," says Preston. "When you are learning something new, you bring to mind all of the things you know that are related to that new information. In doing so, you embed the new information into your existing knowledge."

Preston described how this new understanding might help teachers design more effective ways of teaching. Imagine a college professor is teaching students about how neurons communicate in the human brain, a process that shares some common features with an electric power grid. The professor might first cue the students to remember things they learned in a high school physics class about how electricity is conducted by wires.

"A professor might first get them thinking about the properties of electricity," says Preston. "Not necessarily in lecture form, but by asking questions to get students to recall what they already know. Then, the professor might begin the lecture on neuronal communication. By prompting them beforehand, the professor might help them reactivate relevant knowledge and make the new material more digestible for them."

This research was conducted with adult participants. The researchers will next study whether a similar dynamic is at work with children.

womaninterrupted:

bobbycaputo:

bobbycaputo:

I hate Tuesdays

I still hate Tuesdays

The struggle is real. 

(Source: hurwitzs)

peachtreekeen:

I would like to know who created this masterpiece

peachtreekeen:

I would like to know who created this masterpiece

“I enjoy controlled loneliness. I like wandering around the city alone. I’m not afraid of coming back to an empty flat and lying down in an empty bed. I’m afraid of having no one to miss, of having no one to love.”
— Kuba Wojewodzki, Polish journalist and comedian (via cyncerity)

(Source: wordsthat-speak, via notarobotbutaghost)

D'yer Mak'er
Led Zeppelin/Houses Of The Holy

the-dark-s1de:

Led Zeppelin - D’yer Mak’er (Houses Of The Holy)

(via celeste-boldlygoes)

chuckhistory:

I finally did it… I am in a play… I am now a Serious Hollywood Actor, and not just a Hollywood Actor. 
If you like zombies, horror movies, haunted houses, funny things, blood, and stuff like that, you should come see The Zombie Effect.
Here’s a review - http://giaonthemove.com/2014/10/20/the-zombie-effect-a-north-hollywood-invasion/
Here are tickets - https://www.vendini.com/ticket-software.html?t=tix&e=3bd999a97ccddaad5139f22456a8afd7

Dear LA folks, you should go check this out. I mean how often do get a chance to see a zombies in a theater production, outside of Andrew Lloyd Webber musicals, right?

chuckhistory:

I finally did it… I am in a play… I am now a Serious Hollywood Actor, and not just a Hollywood Actor. 

If you like zombies, horror movies, haunted houses, funny things, blood, and stuff like that, you should come see The Zombie Effect.

Here’s a review - http://giaonthemove.com/2014/10/20/the-zombie-effect-a-north-hollywood-invasion/

Here are tickets - https://www.vendini.com/ticket-software.html?t=tix&e=3bd999a97ccddaad5139f22456a8afd7

Dear LA folks, you should go check this out. I mean how often do get a chance to see a zombies in a theater production, outside of Andrew Lloyd Webber musicals, right?

Non, c’est vraiment un arbre de Noël. Je suis sérieux.

Non, c’est vraiment un arbre de Noël. Je suis sérieux.

(Source: csabaklement, via texnessa)

think-progress:


Africa is the world’s second largest continent. But it’s not unusual for Americans to classify it as a single entity, ignoring the many cultural, economic and geographic differences between its 47 countries. If three countries in Africa are going through an Ebola epidemic, the other 44 must be too, right?

5 schools freaking out about Ebola because they don’t realize Africa is a really big place

think-progress:

Africa is the world’s second largest continent. But it’s not unusual for Americans to classify it as a single entity, ignoring the many cultural, economic and geographic differences between its 47 countries. If three countries in Africa are going through an Ebola epidemic, the other 44 must be too, right?

5 schools freaking out about Ebola because they don’t realize Africa is a really big place

arrestedliterature:

Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

arrestedliterature:

Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

(via halleberiberi)